IN October, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report outlining strategies the world can pursue to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius and maintain healthy economies and ecosystems. But unless we are smart about how we implement that blueprint, it could cause irreparable damage to the world’s great rivers.

This may sound like a luxury for the richest nations, but it is key to building a prosperous Sarawak. The panel’s report urges a rapid transition to low-carbon, renewable sources of electricity. That call to action could trigger expanded investment in hydropower, which is currently the world’s main source for non-carbon energy (70 percent as of 2017). But if that development follows the pattern of earlier dam-building, it could accelerate an alarming loss of rivers and their resources, including of the fish that feed hundreds of millions of people.

Proposals such as that for the Baram Dam illustrate the incredible deception that would result from destroying local forest ecosystems for hydropower development far beyond the regional demand. In fact, this cost is more accurately a giveaway at the cost of the future for Sarawakians.

SEE ALSO: How humans derailed the Earth’s climate in just 160 years

The Baram River is a hugely productive freshwater system, while the promised energy could easily, and more cheaply, come from other projects. Arguments for the dam and others in Sarawak are actually an effort to steal from current and future Sarawakians.

It’s easy to hear claims that only with such a series of large — presumably profitable — dams can Sarawak prosper. But must we sacrifice our rivers to save our climate? Even just a few years ago, that trade-off seemed unavoidable. With wind and solar power limited by their expense and variability, global hydropower was projected to nearly double by 2050.

Massive dams were under construction or planned for many of the world’s great rivers, including the Yangtze, Mekong, and most tributaries of the Amazon. Some governments used climate and renewable energy objectives to justify these projects, even as scientists quantified their impacts and affected communities and indigenous groups protested.

The Bakun Dam on the Balui River in Sarawak, Malaysia. Source: Daniel Kammen

But we do not need to sacrifice rivers for zero-carbon energy. In the last two years, solar energy has rapidly become more economically viable due to technological improvements and to economies of scale in production and deployment. Whereas solar energy used to cost 20 cents or more per kilowatt-hour, new projects in Chile, Mexico, and Saudi Arabia have come in at one-tenth that cost.

Even with falling costs, the variability of wind and solar power remain a challenge. Simply put, in order for these technologies to offer reliable, round-the-clock electricity generation, there needs to be a way to store power when the wind is blowing and the sun is shining and then deploy it when the wind dies down or the sun sets.

SEE ALSO: Why the COP24 climate deal isn’t good enough

Fortunately, the costs for storage technologies are plummeting as well, with the cost of lithium ion batteries, capable of grid-scale storage, dropping by about 90 percent over the past few years. New technologies are emerging as well. For example, a Chilean solar power plant that uses molten salt as storage recently offered to provide 24-hour baseload electricity at less than 5 cents per kilowatt hour. That is comparable to or cheaper than most hydropower and fossil fuel options. Tesla and Google X, meanwhile, are pursuing “moonshot” solutions for storage technologies.

Also tipping the scales toward wind and solar is that, among large infrastructure projects, hydropower dams have among the worst performance in terms of delays and cost overruns, in part due to the conflict and controversy surrounding them. Whereas some dams take a decade to complete, wind and solar power can be delivered through rapid, smaller-scale, and lower-risk projects that tend to engender far less conflict. These technologies are even cheaper if you also invest in energy efficiency and a smarter and more reliable grid.

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Tree stumps at the Bakun Dam Reservoir. Source: Daniel Kammen.

Governments are taking note. Thailand earlier this year signaled that it would delay signing a power purchase agreement for Pak Beng, a 912-megawatt hydropower dam that Laos is planning for the Mekong.

In announcing the delay, the country stated that it needed to revisit its energy strategy, since other renewable sources, including wind and solar, were becoming increasingly viable. Thailand was slated to buy 90 percent of the dam’s electricity, so its change of plans could spell the end of the project. In Guyana, meanwhile, rising cost estimates and delays for the Amaila Falls hydropower project led the government and financiers to transfer funding intended for the dam toward a 100-megawatt solar project.

The rapidly evolving renewable energy landscape doesn’t mean an end to hydropower, but rather a shift in its role. Hydropower reservoirs are currently the dominant form of energy storage for grids, and although other forms of storage are improving, they will continue to provide critical storage services in the near future. Upgraded older dams and strategically planned new projects, carefully located to minimize environmental and social disruption, can emphasize energy storage to facilitate adding large increments of wind and solar into a grid.

SEE ALSO: Mangrove forests’ resilience could help save us from climate change

Although it is now possible to build affordable, low-carbon wind and solar systems, and to couple them with energy storage, they still face constraints, including political preferences for large infrastructure projects. Big projects afford the opportunity for large profits, and all too often, efforts to extort and steal from local residents.

It would be a great tragedy if the renewable revolution arrived just a few years too late to save the world’s great rivers. Market reforms and new financial mechanisms can accelerate the adoption of more sustainable energy systems, as can innovative science.

For example, my Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley recently developed and is using an energy planning model for Laos. We found that investments in solar panels (backed up by existing hydropower) could meet that nation’s objectives for selling electricity to neighbors — with greater returns and lower risks than the planned dams that threaten the Mekong’s fish harvests and the viability of its delta.

There’s no need to continue accepting tragic trade-offs between healthy rivers and low-cost, reliable, and renewable electricity. The renewable revolution provides an opportunity to have both. Governments, funders, developers, and scientists should seize it.

Daniel Kammen is a professor in and the chair of the Energy and Resources Group and a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been a coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a science envoy for the US State Department. 

This article is republished from Mongabay under a Creative Commons licence. 

The post Sarawak doesn’t have to trade in its forests for its future appeared first on Asian Correspondent.

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